The Researcher Emergent: Prologue

by Vance Powell. Toward the end of my first semester as a PhD student in the HomPal program at GW I was invited to collaborate with my advisor and two of our post-docs on a project they’d developed. My role in this endeavor meant using familiar devices like calipers and an osteometric board to collect … Read more

Posted in Uncategorized, April 5th, 2014 | 0 comments

A Serious Question: How Do You Study?

by Liz Renner. Graduate students experience various facets of pedagogy simultaneously. For their own studies, they are expected to master a vast literature in a particular field of interest. They read primary publications and consider the implications of researchers’ findings as well as critique methods, statistics, or conclusions. In addition, graduate TAs guide undergraduate students … Read more

Posted in Uncategorized, March 3rd, 2014 | 0 comments

Paleolithic Pilgrimage

Paleolithic Pilgrimage

by Kathryn Ranhorn. In southwestern France, hours outside of Paris on the way to Bordeaux, lies a small village called Les Eyzies. Haven’t heard of it? Perhaps you have heard of Cro Magnon, Le Moustier, or La Ferassie? These are just a few of the prehistoric sites in the 14.5-square-mile village, and there are dozens … Read more

Posted in Uncategorized, February 19th, 2014 | 0 comments

Does evolution have a place in medicine?

Does evolution have a place in medicine?

by Brian Schilder. As a student in the highly interdisciplinary Hominid Paleobiology Doctoral Program, with an even broader interdisciplinary focus on evolutionary neuroscience, I’ve had the opportunity to learn from instructors hailing from a wide variety of fields. I am currently enjoying a course on neurodevelopmental disorders as taught by a rotating list of neuroscience … Read more

Posted in Uncategorized, February 4th, 2014 | 0 comments

Birds Do It

Birds Do It

by Laurence Dumouchel. My life changed significantly in the past few months. I started a new degree, in a different country, in another language. The Center for the Advanced Study of Hominid Paleobiology has proven to be stimulating in many ways; one of the highlights being the guest speakers invited periodically.  My very first CASHP … Read more

Posted in Uncategorized, January 13th, 2014 | 0 comments

A paleo-cation

A paleo-cation

by Amelia Villaseñor. Vacations used to be a time when I took my mind off work. I would take a few days to decompress, relax, and, more specifically, escape from the ancient past that I study on a daily basis. However, the farther along I get into my PhD research, the harder it has become … Read more

Posted in Uncategorized, January 2nd, 2014 | 0 comments

The Anatomy of a Paleontologist

The Anatomy of a Paleontologist

by David Patterson. For the past semester, I’ve been assisting students in the GW medical school with Human Gross Anatomy. This mainly involves the dissection of cadavers and identification of all the bones, muscles, blood vessels, organs and nerves of the human body. For the medical students, this course serves as the primary foundation upon … Read more

Posted in Uncategorized, December 16th, 2013 | 0 comments

Lost in the mail

by Bernard Wood. Thank you for asking me to comment on the attached manuscript by Lorkipanidze et al. entitled ‘A complete skull from Dmanisi, Georgia, and the evolutionary biology of early Homo.’ It reports an adult hominin cranium, D4500 (aka skull 5), recovered in 2005 from layer B1y in Block 2 at Dmanisi. There are … Read more

Posted in Uncategorized, December 11th, 2013 | 0 comments

The wherefore and why of food photography faux pas

The wherefore and why of food photography faux pas

by Laura Reyes. Martha Stewart’s Twitter account (@MarthaStewart) recently caused a minor uproar in social media this week when she tweeted some…interesting pictures of her food. You would think that the great Martha Stewart would know when food pics are a good thing, but it seems that the concepts of good lighting and a favorable … Read more

Posted in Uncategorized, November 20th, 2013 | 0 comments

A pioneer who deserves more recognition

by Bernard Wood. If you are in an aircraft that is landing at London Heathrow Airport from the east (i.e., approaching over London) and you are sitting on the left side of the ‘plane, and it is a clear day, just before you land you will fly over the world’s largest rugby stadium at Twickenham. … Read more

Posted in Uncategorized, November 6th, 2013 | 0 comments

Rwandan Adventure: Part II

Rwandan Adventure: Part II

by Kate McGrath. Shortly after sunrise we walked a few kilometers to the bus station in Musanze town. To Kigali we go. Amandine Erikson (U. of Indianapolis), Meredith Killough (GWU) and I would spend the next two hours careening down some the highest mountains in Africa on an overcrowded bus while taking in the most … Read more

Posted in Uncategorized, November 1st, 2013 | 0 comments

A data ID to a chimpanzee

A data ID to a chimpanzee

by Kaitlin Wellens. If a stranger walked in and out of my office without ever speaking to me, they would most likely know one very crucial fact—I really, really like chimpanzees.  My fellow graduate student, Jordan Miller, and I did not hesitate to decorate our office space with photos to remind us of our amazing … Read more

Posted in Uncategorized, October 16th, 2013 | 0 comments

Publications that (should have) made a difference: No. 3. ‘Thinking out of the box’

by Bernard Wood. If you go to a meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists (AAPA) and make your way to the bar around 6pm an elderly but sprightly gentleman in a full white beard will be dining on the bar menu, probably with his wife Eleanor. Charles Oxnard, even in what is meant … Read more

Posted in Uncategorized, October 3rd, 2013 | 0 comments

In search of data: the story of an unconventional summer

In search of data: the story of an unconventional summer

by Jordan Miller. As the spring semester winds down and the oppressive heat of summer descends upon the city, the daily commotion of the academic year slows to a more manageable pace. Inboxes seems less flooded, offices less crowded, and the dull roar of a window air-conditioning unit replaces the lunchroom chatter typical of any … Read more

Posted in Uncategorized, September 17th, 2013 | 0 comments

Prospecting for meaning: Archaeology, symbolism, and mineral exploration in Zambia

Prospecting for meaning:  Archaeology, symbolism, and mineral exploration in Zambia

by Andrew Zipkin. Two weeks ago I returned Stateside after a 9 week field season in Zambia, Kenya, and Ethiopia.  Working in Zambia this summer was the culmination of an idea I had been kicking around since I was an undergraduate arguing with Prof. Tom Volman and my classmates at Cornell University about whether or … Read more

Posted in Uncategorized, September 4th, 2013 | 0 comments

A fly on the wall

by Bernard Wood. I have spent much of the summer (but not as much as I should have done) going through the entries in the Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Human Evolution and editing them into a format suitable for a dictionary aimed at undergraduates. I thought it would be a breeze, but I have re-discovered why … Read more

Posted in Uncategorized, September 2nd, 2013 | 0 comments

Finishing a dissertation and making post-dissertation plans

Finishing a dissertation and making post-dissertation plans

by Habiba Chirchir. I spent the past academic year writing up the results of my dissertation, which proved quite a task. I call it a task because it was the first time that I had all my data together and could think of my dissertation as one body of work that needed to be communicated … Read more

Posted in Uncategorized, June 11th, 2013 | 0 comments

The adaptability and perseverance of the scientist

The adaptability and perseverance of the scientist

by Amy Bauernfeind. “The first year graduate student in my lab thinks his Nobel Prize is coming next week.” “She has had a tremendously successful graduate career, successfully maneuvering her way from failure to failure.” Wise senior scientists recently made these statements to me, and I bet that most people with scientific training will get … Read more

Posted in Uncategorized, June 4th, 2013 | 0 comments

Peer-review: an endangered ‘species’?

by Bernard Wood. In the old days one of the “perks” of being medically-qualified in the UK was that if you or your family were sick, colleagues would bend-over-backwards to make sure you or your family were seen as soon as possible. They would see you in their office “out-of-hours,” or they would add you … Read more

Posted in Uncategorized, May 20th, 2013 | 0 comments

Neuroscience for middle schoolers

Neuroscience for middle schoolers

by Serena Bianchi. Whatever your profession, you may have felt at some point that you were running on automatic pilot. Caught between deadlines and meetings, you run faster and faster in the hope of beating that to-do list that keeps re-writing itself everyday. I often think that, compared to other professions, scientists are lucky in … Read more

Posted in Uncategorized, May 16th, 2013 | 0 comments